Category Archives: College living

Insightful podcasts about getting into and choosing the right college

I’ve started podcasting! This article contains important information on college admissions planning in high school from interviews with the Podcast Business News Network’s Jill Nicolini. Read on or skip to the podcasts at the bottom.

I suggest that parents of ninth-graders get together with their students at the beginning of their freshman year to put together a four-year plan leading up to applying for and getting admission to a college that’s a good fit and match (see below). For example, the student could start out with a few honors classes and then take AP courses.  Colleges want students who have challenged themselves with a rigorous curriculum.

There’s nothing worse than graduating with a 4.0 but no challenging classes.  Colleges ask “Where was the rigor, the intellectual curiosity?” Colleges also want students who have tried different things and are well-rounded.  Let your kids explore, that’s how they learn.

At the same time, admissions officers are looking for in-depth experiences.  Showing commitment to a cause or organization is important. They’re also looking for volunteer service.  If a student only does the minimum required number of hours, the college will assume you just wanted to graduate!

Another topic I talk about in my interviews are  the importance of Fit and Match:

  • Will the student like other students there?
  • Will he like the campus and surroundings? Is your student more comfortable in a containedSummer college prep campus with lots of open spaces, or one that’s large and crowded in a city? Close to the beach or the mountains?
  •  How about activities outside the classroom?  This includes more than sports – there’s drama, debate, Model U.N., Beta Club Community service, and more.
  • Also consider the weather.  A northern campus that’s pleasant in summer may be freezing cold in winter!

Also, have a frank discussion about what your family can afford.  There’s nothing worse than discovering after the first year that you really can’t afford your student’s dream college!

Another important consideration – if your student has exceptional talent, private schools who really want him or her have the dollars to provide financial aid. Public schools, while less expensive on the surface, do not have the same amount of financial aid! 

Here’s my May 27 interview.

Here’s my June 3 interview.

 

Will Changes to the Academic Calendar Stick?

Covid-19, horrific in so many ways, has brought one benefit to academia — it has necessitated experimenting with the traditional academic calendar. Fortunately, this forced innovation has pushed the boundaries of what’s considered practicable. Some changes are likely to be carried forward in the post-pandemic era because results show that they’re more effective  for learning and less expensive operationally.

The Traditional Academic Calendar

Jeff Selingo, the author of Next, a newsletter that covers trends in college admissions, observedacademic calendar in a recent issue that, “The academic calendar in higher ed was chiseled in stone decades ago. It’s long been a barrier to change in higher ed.” One reason for the traditional calendar’s incapability of change is that it drives faculty contracts, student loans, allocating classrooms, scheduling student events, and many other facets of college operations.

The calendar’s rigidity is partly due to the inertia that inhibits change in large bureaucracies. Many people like the traditional calendar just the way it is whether it makes sense in 2021 or not. As noted by Dana Goldstein and Kate Taylor in the New York Times recently, “Contrary to popular belief, summer vacation is not a relic of the nation’s agrarian roots. Farm parents most needed their children’s help during spring planting and fall harvests, so schools in the early 19th century often met during the summer and winter. By the late 19th century, however, academic calendars looked a lot more like they do today, with many classroom buildings simply too hot, humid and uncomfortable during the summer.”

Underlying the bias in favor of the status quo has been the widely shared view that the undergraduate years are not just about education. They’re also about the college experience and “coming of age” ­­— four years of semi-adulthood during which students can prepare for whatever comes next. However, this view has  outlived its usefulness for the majority of students because it often makes college unaffordable, impractical, or undesirable, findings affirmed by the exigencies of the pandemic.

The Time for Change Has Come

The pandemic has created a need for college administrators to examine the efficacy of the traditional calendar and to experiment with new modes of learning. This experimentation coincides with the need for a transformation in the modus operandi of American colleges following a decade in which total enrollment declined every year.

In the February issue of Forbes, Brendon Busteed posed the following questions to draw attention to the deficiencies of the traditional academic calendar:

  • “Why do bachelor’s degrees take four years to complete?
  • Why is it that we monitor and report six-year graduation rates for these four-year degrees?
  • Why do we see considerable learning loss over the summer – especially for students from underserved communities?
  • Why has college gotten so expensive?

Many of these questions can be explained and answered to varying degrees through the lens of the academic calendar.”

Busteed has identified three principles he thinks should guide the re-structuring of the academic calendar. Changes should:

  1. Reduce the cost of earning a bachelor’s degree,
  2. Make work-study a fundamental part of earning a degree, and,
  3. Provide flexibility to those seeking or needing alternative paths to a degree.

Examples of Calendar Experiments

A common feature of most pandemic-induced changes has been introducing modules (or blocks) that subdivide semesters and extend through summers. Modules allow for the sort of College calendarflexibility demanded by the wide range of life circumstances among today’s undergraduates. A modular approach also enables colleges to take advantage of the state-of-the-art distance learning systems in which they’ve invested heavily in the last year.

Some module-based changes have been in use for years but weren’t widely adopted prior to the pandemic because there was no compelling reason to do so. For example:

    1. Arizona State now divides its semester into three modules: A and B, which run consecutively for 7.5 weeks each, and C, which runs the full 15 weeks of the semester. This allows students to mix classroom courses with online courses, which run the same 7.5 weeks, and can free time up either at the beginning or the end of a semester to intern, work on a project, or focus on 15-week courses. However, the same semester structure has been available to students in a number of colleges since the 1990’s because it’s well-suited to the needs of students who work full-time. The “A-B-C” modular approach has proven that it works and is popular with students.

2.   Georgia Tech offers five-week-long “mini-mester” courses. Mini-mester classes meet Monday through Thursday for three hours and cover the same material as a full semester. Mini-mesters have been conducted during the break between fall and spring semesters since they were introduced after the conversion of the fall semester to its current schedule in 1970. Prior to 1970, the fall semester was interrupted by a 2-week break for the Christmas-New Year’s holidays and then resumed in the first week of January, finishing by the end of the month.

This was followed by a 3-week semester break. Starting the fall semester earlier and ending it just before the holidays enabled colleges to combine the 2-week and the 3- week breaks into one 5-week period, which allowed time for a mini-mester. Mini-mesters were instantly popular with students who wanted three extra credits or simply found time off in mid-winter pointless. Like “A-B-C” semesters, mini-mesters have proven their viability over time.

3.  The majority of college summer programs are being re-structured into a third semester for 2021. They’ll have two sessions and offer a larger choice of courses than the limited set of past years. Colleges are modifying summer school to enable students to complete courses that they were forced to drop or which were unavailable due to the pandemic. However, summer-as-third-semester is a model that’s likely to be adopted permanently. With a full-time, year-round academic calendar, students who choose to do so will be able to complete all requirements for a bachelor’s degree in 3 years or less, which is common in the U.K. and Europe.

Changes to the traditional academic calendar are likely to appeal to you as an applicant.  In being more closely aligned with needs and preferences, a re-structured calendar can help you to achieve your educational goals faster.

There is one downside —  the more choices available in the academic calendars of colleges, the more challenging the process of selecting your best-fit colleges will be. In addition to all of the other variables in play, you’ll need to add your preferred calendar to the mix, a consideration that wasn’t even on applicant’s radar in the past. The expert guidance of an experienced Independent Educational Consultant (IEC) thus becomes even more advantageous to you as we approach the 2021-22 admissions year.

Things Can Go Very Wrong no Matter Where You Live!

There are students who, in normal times, see benefits to living on campus for all four undergraduate years. On campus, they feel like they’re at the center of all things important to them. On the other hand, there are many students, especially upperclassmen, who prefer the independence from administrative influence that comes with living off-campus.

This dichotomy has long existed on campuses across the country. At any college, the ratio of students in the two camps is determined by factors such as a college’s policies, the cost of room and board, the local cost of living, the availability of rentals, and the ease of finding part time jobs in the area.

We have seen recently that things can go very wrong no matter where you live at college. Consider the unpleasantness that both on-campus and off-campus residents experienced earlier this year due to the coronavirus — an unforeseen crisis. Colleges closed dormitories abruptly, with all residents, including international students unable to return home, ordered to leave ASAP. Many on-campus residents never received refunds for the fees they paid for the semester. Most off-campus students were locked into contracts for rentals even though their purpose for living in them ended when classes did.

Like so many other things, the pandemic has affected college housing choices. If you’re a high school senior planning to attend a residential college in the fall of 2021, you should keep apprised of what’s happening on campuses this fall.

To Open or Not To Open

There are two main factors working at cross-purposes in a college’s decision to open their residence and dining halls. The first is money. Both public and private institutions have invested heavily to upgrade on-campus residential life in order to remain competitive. To earn a return on these investments, colleges have increased their residential fees by 9% annually over the last ten years, which is much more than the rate of inflation and also exceeds the rate that tuition has risen.

In a recent year, colleges collectively realized $15.5 billion in revenue for room and board and spent $14.9 billion to provide it, generating a surplus of $600 million. But if they’re empty, residence facilities chew up overhead while generating no revenue, causing substantial losses. This scenario incentivizes college administrators to open dormitories and dining halls.

The second factor, health, pulls in the opposite direction. Colleges long ago shed the burden of acting in loco parentis for their students, but they’re still ethically obligated to protect their student’s health. This is their duty regardless of how severe the financial impact may be on the college.

The tension between these two forces is being played out in real time as administrators waffle between alternatives. The choices are clear. They may open their campuses to business as usual, keep their campuses closed and conduct virtual classes, or offer a hybrid approach.

Thus far, the plans of administrators have proven ephemeral and subject to sudden change. Examples include UNC – Chapel Hill and Notre Dame, where students returned in August for one week before the rate of infection caused the campuses to close again. Imagine how many lives were disrupted by just these two quick policy reversals.

Certain administrators feel compelled to fill their dormitories to capacity this fall. Some are under contract with private corporations that operate the college’s residential facilities. Any policy that limits revenue makes the college subject to a lawsuit. The University System of Georgia is one of the largest institutions in this predicament. Other colleges are opening but with long lists of safety precautions that they’re undertaking to curtail the spread of the virus. Unfortunately, the efficacy of these measures will only be knowable in retrospect. It’s a roll of the dice.

What’s shocking is that decisions of such major consequence are being left to you — the student. Administrators seem reluctant to make tough decisions and stick with them. That’s why the current operations of so many colleges are subject to the day-to-day vicissitudes of a viral disease. The quality of administrative leadership of America’s colleges has been spotty, to say the least. Perhaps we can take comfort that from this experience, improvements in preparedness for future crises are bound to evolve.