Yearly Archives: 2021

Charlotte Smarty Pants Conversation with Charlotte Klaar on College Admissions

Here’s an interesting and interactive conversation I had earlier this year with Jennifer Plym and Charlotte Smarty Pants logo Cheryl Taylor of Charlotte Smarty Pants about College Admissions.

In this podcast we discuss when families should start thinking about college.  I advise that parents start thinking about college – or some other form of post-high school education when their students are in middle school.  They should think about how they’re going to pay for college, and create a college mindset for their student.

By high school, have a plan, let your child stretch academically.  If a student has a facility in math, let her take an AP math class.  If it doesn’t work out, then she can step back.

Our conversation emphasized that every year in high school it important.  College Admissions officers are looking for trends.  They want to see that a kid is improving each year, and that they are challenging themselves with increasingly difficult courses.

I also give advice on PSAT tests – they should be a guide for students to identify areas where they need more help and work.  Although there are about 1,000 colleges that are truly test-optional (including Wake Forest), students should take both the ACT and SAT tests.  Some students do better on one or the other, and that’s the one they should submit.

We also discuss finding a college that’s a good fit, and how kids views of college size, how far they want to be from home, etc. change as they go through high school.

It’s well worth the time to listen to, and if you have questions, contact me at [email protected]!

Jumpstart your student’s H.S. & college success!

This seminar has been rescheduled from August 19 to September 16.

Discover what students need to know to shine in high school and get accepted to their desired colleges in this one-time free seminar with Charlotte Klaar, Ph D, of Klaar College Consulting and Amy Haskell, MA, M.Ed. of Total Writing Enrichment.

students

      • Learn how great writing skills give students an advantage in high school, which can lead to success in college essays and admissions.
      • Find out what courses, activities, and skills are important to college admissions counselors.
      • Learn about the importance of finding a college that’s a good fit for you.
      • Get insights into teenage brains and tips on teaching your to be student independent.

    September 16, 2021  6:30 PM
    The Studios at Loom, 118 Academy St., Ft. Mill, SC  29715
    Seats are limited.  Register Now!

    For more questions, contact [email protected] or [email protected]

    Co-sponsored by The Studios at Loom

Little-Known Secrets for Paying for College Recording

Worried about how you’re going to pay for college?  Listen to this recording of a recent webinar with Klaar College Consulting and the College Funding Coach.  The actual recording starts at minute eight, so please move the bar up to that point to begin listening.

Some of the financial topics covered include:

  • Using student loans to manage cash flow.
  • If you refinance your home to cover college costs, have a plan to pay it off.college consultant SC
  • How to tap into other people’s money, such as with private scholarships.
  • Understanding the family’s Expected Financial Contribution.
  • What is need-based financial aid.
  • How the 529 Plan works in S. Carolina.

Additionally, I talk about how parents should get together with their students at the beginning of their freshman year to put together a four-year plan leading up to applying for and getting admission to a college that’s a good fit and match (see below). For example, the student could start out with a few honors classes and then take AP courses.  Colleges want students who have challenged themselves with a rigorous curriculum.

There’s nothing worse than graduating with a 4.0 but no challenging classes.  Colleges ask “Where was the rigor, the intellectual curiosity?” Colleges also want students who have tried different things and are well-rounded.

Although college costs are soaring, a state college is not necessarily less expensive than a private college.  Private colleges have endowments, and if your student is someone they really want, they will offer grants that may make college far more affordable.

The importance of Fit and Match:

  • Will the student like other students there?
  • Will he like the campus and surroundings? Is your student more comfortable in a contained campus with lots of open spaces, or one that’s large and crowded in a city? Close to the beach or the mountains?
  •  How about activities outside the classroom?  This includes more than sports – there’s drama, debate, Model U.N., Beta Club Community service, and more.
  • Also consider the weather.  A northern campus that’s pleasant in summer may be freezing cold in winter!

A good fit and match mean your student is much more likely to graduate in four years, and not transfer to another college and lose precious credits.  My students almost all graduate in four years, but the average graduation time is a pricey six years!

Little-Known Secrets of Paying for College

I am excited to announce that Klaar College Consulting will be co-hosting two free webinars with The College Funding Coach® on July 15th at 12 noon and 6:30 p.m. This virtual event on “Little-Known Secrets for Paying for College” is for any family wanting to learn how to pay for college (designed for families with students in grades K – 12). 

The College Funding Coach® was founded in 2002 to help families better understand the  complexities of paying for college and how to make higher education more affordable. They have established an approach that helps parents understand the college funding process, reduce their out-of-pocket expenses, and balance the challenge of saving for college and retirement simultaneously.

July 15 Zoom webinars:

12:00 – 1:30 PM Session – CLICK HERE
6:30 – 8 PM Session – CLICK HERE

Specific financial topics include:

  • Using student loans to manage cash flow.
  • If you refinance your home to cover college costs, have a plan to pay it off.
  • How to tap into other people’s money, such as with private scholarships.
  • Understanding the family’s Expected Financial Contribution.
  • What is need-based financial aid.
  • How the 529 Plan works in S. Carolina.

Additionally, I’ll be talking about  how parents should get together with their students at the beginning of their freshman year to put together a four-year plan leading up to applying for and getting admission to a college that’s a good fit and match (see below). For example, the student could start out with a few honors classes and then take AP courses.  Colleges want students who have challenged themselves with a rigorous curriculum.

There’s nothing worse than graduating with a 4.0 but no challenging classes.  Colleges ask “Where was the rigor, the intellectual curiosity?” Colleges also want students who have tried different things and are well-rounded.

Although college costs are soaring, a state college is not necessarily less expensive than a private college.  Private colleges have endowments, and if your student is someone they really want, they will offer grants that may make college far more affordable.

Another topic I talk about is  the importance of Fit and Match:

  • Will the student like other students there?
  • Will he like the campus and surroundings? Is your student more comfortable in a containedSummer college prep campus with lots of open spaces, or one that’s large and crowded in a city? Close to the beach or the mountains?
  •  How about activities outside the classroom?  This includes more than sports – there’s drama, debate, Model U.N., Beta Club Community service, and more.
  • Also consider the weather.  A northern campus that’s pleasant in summer may be freezing cold in winter!

A good fit and match means your student is much more likely to graduate in four years, and not transfer to another college and loose precious credits.  My students almost all graduate in four years, but the average graduation time is a pricey six years!

This is a free educational event. Please register by clicking below. For questions, contact me at [email protected]

July 15 Zoom webinars:

12:00 PM Session – CLICK HERE
6:30 PM Session – CLICK HERE

Insightful podcasts about getting into and choosing the right college

I’ve started podcasting! This article contains important information on college admissions planning in high school from interviews with the Podcast Business News Network’s Jill Nicolini. Read on or skip to the podcasts at the bottom.

I suggest that parents of ninth-graders get together with their students at the beginning of their freshman year to put together a four-year plan leading up to applying for and getting admission to a college that’s a good fit and match (see below). For example, the student could start out with a few honors classes and then take AP courses.  Colleges want students who have challenged themselves with a rigorous curriculum.

There’s nothing worse than graduating with a 4.0 but no challenging classes.  Colleges ask “Where was the rigor, the intellectual curiosity?” Colleges also want students who have tried different things and are well-rounded.  Let your kids explore, that’s how they learn.

At the same time, admissions officers are looking for in-depth experiences.  Showing commitment to a cause or organization is important. They’re also looking for volunteer service.  If a student only does the minimum required number of hours, the college will assume you just wanted to graduate!

Another topic I talk about in my interviews are  the importance of Fit and Match:

  • Will the student like other students there?
  • Will he like the campus and surroundings? Is your student more comfortable in a containedSummer college prep campus with lots of open spaces, or one that’s large and crowded in a city? Close to the beach or the mountains?
  •  How about activities outside the classroom?  This includes more than sports – there’s drama, debate, Model U.N., Beta Club Community service, and more.
  • Also consider the weather.  A northern campus that’s pleasant in summer may be freezing cold in winter!

Also, have a frank discussion about what your family can afford.  There’s nothing worse than discovering after the first year that you really can’t afford your student’s dream college!

Another important consideration – if your student has exceptional talent, private schools who really want him or her have the dollars to provide financial aid. Public schools, while less expensive on the surface, do not have the same amount of financial aid! 

Here’s my May 27 interview.

Here’s my June 3 interview.

 

Insights into the Top Engineering Schools

If you’re a high school student with the right aptitudes and interests, you should consider engineering as a college major. A degree in engineering is an excellent foundation for a financially and personally rewarding career. To succeed at an engineering school, however, you must be willing to work hard and to dedicate yourself to the engineering discipline you choose.

The starting salaries of engineers are among the highest of undergraduate majors. For example, in a recent year, the engineering graduates of MIT received an average of $95,000 asMIT starting salaries. Their employers were mostly blue chip companies in the technology and consulting sectors, including Google, Oracle, Amazon, McKinsey, Accenture, Apple, Boeing, Microsoft, ExxonMobil, General Motors, Boston Consulting, Morgan Stanley, Booz Allen, Goldman Sachs, and Intel.

Once you’ve decided to major in engineering, you should build a target list of those institutions that best fit your needs and preferences. Before developing your list,  determine which types of engineering appeal to you most. There is a wide range of engineering disciplines, and your preferences will be essential in the selection of colleges. No single institution offers degrees in all, or even most, of the engineering disciplines.

Engineering Specialties

The six main categories of engineering are civil, computer, electrical, scientific, mechanical, and environmental. Within these categories, there are many specialties, many of which are integrated with a science curriculum. The range of engineering degrees offered by American colleges is indicated below in Table A.

Table A: Engineering Specialties in American Colleges

Agricultural Bioengineering Architectural Aeronautical
Aerospace Civil Computer/Software Construction
Electrical Environmental Genetic Industrial
Manufacturing Marine Materials Mechanical
Metallurgical Mining Nuclear Geological
Hydraulics Chemical Automotive Electronics

Top Engineering Schools Ranked and Compared

MIT is first on almost everyone’s list of the best engineering schools, but other top-tier engineering schools are close behind. Column A in Table B is the top 20 National Universities according to the U.S. News and World Report rankings for 2021. Column B is the top 20 Engineering Universities for 2021. After each Engineering University in Column B  is the rank of that institution on the Column A National Universities list.

Table B: Top National Universities and Top Engineering Universities

Rank Best National Universities             Rank Best Engineering Universities
1 Princeton 1 MIT  (4)
2 Harvard 2 Stanford (6)
3 Columbia 2 UC Berkeley (22)
4 MIT 4 Georgia Tech (35)
4 Yale 5 Cal Tech (9)
6 Stanford 6 Carnegie Mellon (26)
6 Chicago 6 Illinois (47)
8 UPenn 9 Cornell (18)
9 Cal Tech 9 Purdue (53)
9 Johns Hopkins 11 Texas (42)
9 Northwestern 12 Princeton (1)
12 Duke 13 Columbia (3)
13 Dartmouth 13 Johns Hopkins (9)
14 Brown 13 Northwestern (9)
14 Vanderbilt 13 Texas A&M (66)
16 Rice 13 Wisconsin (42)
16 Washington U – St. Louis 13 Virginia Tech (74)
18 Cornell    19 Rice (16)
19 Notre Dame 19 UC Los Angeles (20)
20 UC Los Angeles 19 U. of Washington (58)

Source: U.S. News and World Report

Only half of the top 20 National Universities are also among the top 20 Engineering Universities. The other 10 range from #22 (UC Berkeley) to #66 (Texas A&M).  Only MIT is in the top five in both Columns.

There are many institutions with less selective admissions policies than those listed above that also provide first rate engineering educations. These include Bucknell, James Madison, North Carolina State, Rensselaer, Florida, Virginia, Clemson, Harvey Mudd, North Carolina, Penn State, Maryland, Ohio State, Cooper Union, and Florida State. All five of the U.S. military academies provide an excellent education in engineering.

Two of the best engineering schools in the country warrant special note for their innovative engineering programs. They are the Carnegie Mellon Institute of Technology and the College of Engineering at Georgia Tech.

Students at Carnegie have the option to augment their engineering degree with one of 10 interdisciplinary majors, each conducted in conjunction with a specific science curriculum.  Undergraduates can complete an accelerated master’s degree within one year of earning their bachelor’s degree.

Students at Georgia Tech’s College of Engineering also have an extensive range of majors in which to specialize, from medical physics to aerospace engineering. Among the programs offered, the industrial and biomedical engineering programs are especially well regarded.

If you’d like more guidance on selecting an engineering school and’s a good match academically, socially and financially, contact me at [email protected] or 803-487-9777.  I work with students in-person and virtually throughout the nation and the Virgin Islands.

 

Yes, You Get What You Pay For

With independent educational consultants, as with most things in life, you get what you pay for!

If you were searching for an eye surgeon, would you go with the cheapest one you could find? Probably not. After all, these are your EYES!

You would likely ask for recommendations, research the professional background of the surgeon, find out how many surgeries he or she had performed, etc.

The same holds true for selecting an independent educational consultant or college planner.

Some private colleges can cost a family more than $250,000 over four years. In-state public colleges may be less expensive, but they may also not have the level of scholarships available and may not end up costing less than a private college who really wants your student.  For example, Loyola University Maryland offered one of my 2021 students a $30,000 scholarship, whereas the University of South Carolina-Columbia (a public school) only offered a third as much.

When you’re making a substantial investment in your student, you want to make sure you weigh all options and find the absolute best fit.

As a member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association, I have an extensive knowledge of colleges, can broaden your student’s potential choices, and provide vital help in weighing factors such as your student’s passions, costs, location, and curriculum.

Here’s an example:

One student I worked with was Gabe, an intelligent young man with learning differences.

He had been attending a music preparatory program at a respected college in his home town.  The college wanted him as an undergraduate student, and he wanted to go there to be close to home.  He was concerned about moving out of his comfort zone. However, his parents wanted him to think bigger and grow musically.  I showed him other music programs and explained that they didn’t need to be too far away.

 “He didn’t want a large school or to be too far from home, she helped direct him to the right program. He ended up at Catholic University of America.  It wasn’t his first choice, but when he did the first piano audition, they called him, and got him scholarships,” said his Mom.

How did that work out for him?

college decisions

“Gabe graduated last year and is doing his Masters in Piano Performance, also at CUA, so she (Dr. Klaar) really helped him make the best choice for him (perfect school size, location, great piano teachers…). He felt comfortable enough to not apply for any support and found his own way of studying and made it through college successfully (Cum Laude and Dean’s list seven semesters out of eight!)” Gabe’s Mom later reported.

Hearing that brought tears to my eyes.  That’s why I’m passionate about what I do. I understand the importance of taking the time to get to know students and their families well enough to create a college career path for each student’s unique goals and strengths.

I use a friendly but no-nonsense, no-excuses style to work with students to help make the college search, application and essay process a delightful adventure of self-discovery and growth. Along the way, I help students learn to make more informed decisions and to own the process.

That’s why students trust me, respect my knowledge and experience, and work hard to meet their assignments and deadlines.

That knowledge and experience is hard-earned; I belong to all the top College Consultant professional organizations, and was the third college consultant to be honored with the Prestigious Steven R. Antonoff Award for Professional Achievement by the Independent Educational Consultants Association.

Before you make the important decision to select an independent college consultant for your family, ask these questions:

  1. Do you guarantee admission to a school, one of my top choices, or a certain minimum dollar value in scholarships? (Do NOT trust any offer of guarantees.)
  2. How do you keep up with new trends, academic changes, and evolving campus cultures? How often do you get out and visit college, school, and program campuses and meet with admissions representatives? (The ONLY way to know about the best matches for you is to be out visiting schools regularly – post pandemic, of course.)
  3. Do you belong to any professional associations?  (The National Association for College Admission Counseling and the Higher Education Consultants Association along with the IECA are the primary associations for independent educational consultants with established and rigorous standards for membership.)
  4. Do you attend professional conferences or training workshops on a regular basis to keep up with regional and national trends and changes in the law? (This is a must!)
  5. Do you ever accept any form of compensation from a school, program, or company in exchange for placement or a referral? (They absolutely should not!)
  6. Are all fees involved stated in writing, up front, indicating exactly what services I will receive for those fees? (Absolutely mandatory.)
  7. Will you complete the application for admission, re-write my essays, or fill out the financial aid forms on my behalf? (No, they should NOT; it is essential that the student be in charge of the process and all materials should be a product of the student’s own, best work.)
  8. How long have you been in business as an independent educational consultant (IEC)?  (A long tenure with documented professional accomplishments buys you expertise.)

Four more important questions…

While anyone can hang out a shingle and claim to be an independent educational consultant or college counselor, it pays to go beyond price and ask the important questions.

If you’d like to learn more, contact me at [email protected] or call 1-803-487-9777.

Here’s Why it’s Best to be Likeable on Your College Application

If you brag about yourself now and then, you aren’t a braggart. But we all know some people who overdo it. It’s especially tempting for applicants to overdo it in the college admissions process of competitive colleges. Although understandable, bragging is harmful to an applicant.

In our society, excessive bragging is considered a negative trait. Narcissist, egotist, blowhard, conceited, and egocentric are just a few of the pejoratives used to refer to braggarts. This is not how you want to be perceived by others, least of all by admissions officials.

Successful applicants don’t brag, and for good reason. College admissions officers, like most people, consider modesty an admirable virtue. So you need to devise subtle ways to make your worthiness obvious.

It’s ironic but true that we readily recognize boastfulness in others, but we’re often slow to recognize it in ourselves. High self-esteem, normally a healthy attribute, often encourages us to think like baseball legend Dizzy Dean, who said, “It ain’t bragging if you can do it.”  Even if you share this belief, don’t reflect it in your applications.

The trick is to display self-confidence but not vanity in making your best impression on admissions reviewers. This can make you distinctive and memorable. But if you cross the line into boastfulness, you risk turning them off. Many opportunities to strut your stuff present themselves on résumés, on the Common App, in interviews, and in essays. But you don’t need to blow your own horn.

Below are tips to help you avoid bragging while remaining upbeat about yourself and your qualifications:

  • Come across as likable. Although this shouldn’t be the case, an unlikable applicant will have difficulty gaining admission to a highly selective college no matter how good their academic record may be. Colleges have a profile of an ideal student that they use to size up applicants. The admissions committee has many applicants who are equally well qualified, so they’ll admit the ones who seem most likely to fit in with their fellow students.
  • Let others boast about you. Remember that teachers and others who write your  letters of recommendation can sing your praises. Take steps to assure that they do.
  • Describe what you did, not what you are. Which sounds better, “I’m a committed humanitarian” or “I set up a food bank in my town that helped many people in need”?  One of the problems caused by bragging is the question of whether something you say about yourself can be readily verified. How do admissions officials know you’re being factual when you claim to have a commendable personal characteristic? If you make such a claim but don’t provide  evidence, they must rely on your word alone. When a boast is based on your unsubstantiated self-report, you won’t be believed.
  • Share the glory. For example, regarding the above reference to a food bank, it’s recommended that you add something like, “…with the assistance of other caring people in the community”.
  • Be kind. Never say anything negative about a person or organization. The school prefers not to have judgmental people in their student body. There are other ways to convey an idea without disparaging anyone.
  • No showboating. Although you want to come across as confident of yourself and your accomplishments, avoid preening.

According to our culture’s social norms, people are expected to be modest. Those who aren’t modest upset the expectations of others. Impression management, an art practiced by many successful people, is all about subtly leading others to view you favorably. If admissions officials think you’re trying too hard, you may alienate them. You may accomplish the exact opposite of your intent, which is to get them to like you.

Parts of your application, especially essays, afford opportunities to reveal your best self. Design your message to appeal to admissions officers on two levels. First, grab their attention with story and style. Next, include verifiable facts that motivate them to advocate for you. Being likable helps win them over to your cause.

Who knows himself a braggart, let him fear this, for it will come to pass that every braggart shall be found an ass”.  — Shakespeare

 

 

Simpler FAFSA Helps College Affordability

After a half century of bloated tuition increases, circumstances are reaching critical mass, as has been recently revealed by the Covid-19 pandemic. Demand for bachelor’s degrees has been declining, yet tuition continues to rise. The U.S. is tenth in the world in the percentage of 25- to 34-year-olds who have earned a bachelor’s degree, but first in the amount paid in tuition for those degrees.

A positive step toward solving the affordability crisis was the recent enactment of the FAFSA Simplification Act of 2020, a law designed to simplify the student financial aid process and make it more equitable. Under the law, far more than the current 60% of high school students are expected to submit a FAFSA to obtain their fair share of the $120 billion in financial aid disbursed every year by the Federal government. The more students who receive financial aid, the more of them will be able to afford college. Enrollment will increase accordingly.

The FAFSA Simplification Act of 2020

The FAFSA Simplification Act of 2020 is a 167-page insert to the 5,593-page Omnibus Act for 2021 that was signed into law on December 27, 2020. The primary purpose of the Act is to make it easier to complete the FAFSA so that a larger percentage of students will submit it to obtain the Federal financial aid to which they’re entitled.

Revising the FAFSA is a complex undertaking. It will take time to establish new rules and modify administrative processes, so the changes in the Act won’t go into effect until July 1, 2023, the first day of the 2023-24 academic year. The new FAFSA will be available online on October 1, 2022, so students who are now high school sophomores— the college Class of 2028 — will be the first to use it.

Here’s What the FAFSA Simplification Act of 2020 Does:

1. Increases the Income Protection Allowance (IPA) for dependent students from the current $6,970 to $9,410, a 35% increase. Since student income in excess of the IPA is assessed as an asset at 50% of its value under the FAFSA methodology.  This IPA increase will reduce the existing disincentive for students to seek part-time and summer employment.

2.  Increases the independent unmarried student IPA from the current $10,840 to $14,630, an increase of 35%.

3.  Eliminates the term Expected Family Contribution (EFC) and replaces it with Student Aid Index (SAI). Many parents mistakenly believe that the EFC is the amount they will have to pay for college, but the real figure is often much higher. However, clarifying the terminology won’t help the main problem that parents experience. They still won’t know the actual cost to attend a college until their child has applied to and been accepted by that college.

4.  Expands eligibility for Pell Grants to include incarcerated students.

5.  Changes to the SAI will make it easier to identify the neediest students.

6.  Re-defines Cost of Attendance (COA). COA will include tuition and fees, housing and meals (previously Room and Board), books and other course materials, transportation, personal expenses, Federal loan fees, and any costs associated with obtaining professional licenses, certifications, or credentials. The Act stipulates that the itemized COA must be disclosed on every college’s website.

7.  Increases the amount of the parent IPA that is shielded from the SAI. For a 3-person family, the IPA increases by 20% to $29,040.

8.  Changes the law regarding divorced or separated parents by eliminating the current standard, which is “The parent you lived with more during the past 12 months”. Under the new law, the parent who provides more financial support will be the parent required to report income and assets on the FAFSA. This will close a loophole that has been abused by some divorced and separated parents.

9.  Eliminates the question, “Other untaxed income not reported.” Such income as worker’s compensation and veteran’s educational benefits will no longer need to be reported as untaxed student income.

10.  Eliminates the question, “Money received or paid on your behalf.” No longer will a distribution from a grandparent-owned 529 account or a cash gift from relatives be reportable as untaxed student income.

11.  Renames the term Simplified Needs Test to the Applicants Exempt from Asset Reporting. Makes qualification easier by raising the Adjusted Gross Income cutoff from $50,000 to $60,000.

12.  Prohibits colleges and financial aid administrators from establishing a policy that doesn’t allow appeals of financial aid decisions.

13.  Expands the authority of financial aid administrators to exercise professional judgement. It allows them to consider a broader range of special circumstances including natural disasters, national emergencies, recession or economic downturn, and substantial losses in business, investments, and real estate.

14.  Reduces obstacles for homeless and foster youth in accessing Federal aid.

15.  Expands the definition of “independent student” to include students who are unable to contact their parent as well as students for whom contact with their parent would place them at risk.

16.  Removes the suspension of Federal student aid eligibility for individuals convicted of drug-related offenses.

17.  No longer divides the SAI by the number of family members in college. This change will substantially reduce financial aid eligibility for those families with multiple members in college simultaneously.

18.  Prohibits a college admissions consultant or financial aid counselor from charging a fee to help a family with the FAFSA. This means that families will be able to obtain FAFSA assistance only from volunteers.

19.  Makes it easier for the Department of Education and the Internal Revenue Service to share tax data so student aid applications can be processed faster.

20.  Forgives $1.3 billion in Federal loans that were made to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s) for repairs, renovations, and construction.

Changes to the FAFSA Are an Improvement, But…

The new FAFSA is an improvement over the current one in most respects. However, it introduces two changes that run counter to the interests of most families. These are Change 17, below, which removes the accommodation for families with more than one student attending college at the same time, and Change 18, which prevents consultants from charging a fee to assist families with the FAFSA. A summary of the major changes is provided below.

In addition to FAFSA simplification, the Omnibus Act for 2021 included emergency spending to help colleges and students cope with the impact of COVID-19. It also took foundational steps toward fundamental reforms in post-secondary education. The American Rescue Plan (ARP) Act, enacted on March 12, 2021, provided additional funds to colleges and students to cover pandemic-related expenses. It too included provisions that lead to reforms.

saving on college costsEven these two helpful acts of legislation, as welcome as they are, can’t cure what ails college education in America the most — excessively high tuition. No action has been taken on reforms such as debt-free college, the $1.5 trillion in outstanding student debt, the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, and the unaffordability of most colleges for the average American family. Further work needs to be done in these areas.

Get a jump-start on your college essay and application in 3 days!

Worried that virtual learning has put your student behind during Important high schoolstudent preparing for college years?  Are you concerned about your student getting  behind on his or her essay, common application and resume? Our Summer Camps will give your student a jumpstart on key aspects of college admissions  in just 3 days!

You’ll also get the latest update of how the coronavirus is impacting college admissions.

DATES:  June 15 – June 17, 2021, 1 – 4 p.m. each day.

Co-sponsored by LOOM Coworking, Gallery and Event Space

Day 1:  Students, we’ll tackle the dreaded college essay, including how to find the right topic and how to structure it so that it reflects who you are and why you would be a great addition to the campus community.

Day 2:  Work on your resume and activities for your common application and continue refining your primary essay.

Day 3:  Complete your common application and do further work on your essay and resume.  Dr. Klaar will edit and send her comments post-seminar.

All 3 sessions (9 hours total are just $350! (You must sign up for all 3 sessions)

If groups of three sign up together, each student saves $50!

Sign up today – only 10 students will be accepted into the summer camp!

Payment is due upon registration.

[email protected],  803-487-9777